10 Ways to Use Music in Your Classroom

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Most teachers agree that using music can enhance learning. Yet, many teachers get stuck, not knowing what to play or how to use music to the fullest. Here are 10 ideas you can implement today in your classroom!

1. Transitions – music is a great tool when switching subjects of changing directions for your students. It has a way of resetting the stage so that children can mentally switch from one topic to another. Play a song to summarize what was just finished, or a song about what is coming next. Allow the children to stand up, march around the room or do hand movements to mark the transition. You will find your children fresh and engaged for the next subject. Click here for some great transition songs!

2. Energize – When children have been focusing on a subject for a time and begin to get fatigued (usually marked by restlessness, inattention, disruptive behavior), take a break from the class and call a music break. Play a activating song, best if related to the topic, to re-energize the children. Click here for some great suggestions!

3. Use Lyrics – display lyrics on a whiteboard, smart-board or on flip chart paper. Have the children find sight words, diagram the sentences or pull out academic vocabulary. Using the text while the song plays, gives relevance to the lyrics and allows the children to learn conventions, build vocabulary and enhance reading and literacy. Nearly all the music at Songs For Teaching is sold with lyrics.

4. Write Lyrics – collect a few instrumental tracks of familiar songs and as an assignment have the children write their own lyrics. This can be done individually, in small groups or with the class at large. The teacher can incorporate a current theme or target information learned from a particular lesson. It might be a great project for a poetry lesson! Here are several suggestions for instrumental tracks.

5. Power of the Pause – Pausing the music at key spots in the music can increase engagement. Pause before the end of a line and ask the children to finish the line. Then think of other words you could substitute for the actual lyric. Brainstorm other words that rhyme or words that may change the meaning! Use the pause button with any song (remember musical chairs?). For rhyming songs try Jack Hartmann’s Rap, Clap, Rhyme. Also see Marla Lewis’ Rhyme Riddles!

6. Pair with Literature – There are a number of ways to pair songs with the books the children are reading. Teachers can select songs that relate directly to the book. For example, if your class is reading Mr. Popper’s Penguins, you can incorporate this song also titled Mr. Popper’s Penguins directly about the book. Or you can find songs about a related topic such as Penguin Partyabout the different types of penguins or Puffin’s Summer Picnic to learn about animals of the Arctic. This can be a great way to address the Common Core directive to integrate science, social studies etc into reading. Or . . . flip it! Listen to a song before going to the library and have the children find related books! Click Here for more songs inspired by Children’s Literature.


7. Make Music Video – This is a great project to integrate the sciences. Children can find photos on the internet and arrange them in a slide show to convey meaning in the song. Take the song Hibernation for example. . Children can collect photos of hibernating animals and sync them to the music. How about a song about amphibians . . . or a song about the solar system. Not only do the children enjoy the science lesson, they build their technology skills as well.

8. Coordinate with Holidays – Most teachers are used to playing songs related to the big holidays, but don’t forget the other special days of the year. For example, Earth Day is coming soon. It is a great time to play music related to conservation such as Music with Mar.’s Can It, Save the Planet. It also can be a great way to integrate songs about historical figures related to that holiday. For Earth Day, you could play a song about John Muir and learn the history of the day.

9. Have a Performance! This can be something simple like a performing for the classroom, perhaps across grade levels or with reading buddies. Or it can be for a school assembly or parent night. Using instrumental tracks saves the day when an accompanists cannot be found. Click here for some suggestions for performances! Make costumes and write your own scripts. Try one of our great musicals that come fully scripted complete with vocal and instrumental tracks.

10. Just plain fun! Try some silly songs for the simple joy of it. Make the classroom environment one that nurture’s children’s creativity and natural desire for learning.

We Have Much To Be Thankful For. . .

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We enter this season of Thanksgiving with very grateful hearts as we have experienced enormous kindness and love over the past three months. At the end of August, our 20 year old daughter, Monica, was in a hiking accident in Northern Arizona and suffered a broken neck and sever head injury. It is the kind of incident that stops you in your tracks and throws your life into a tailspin.

Today, Monica is doing wonderfully well. She spent 2 months in the hospital and now works hard in an intensive rehab program. We expect a full and strong recovery! Monica is beginning to integrate back into her very active college life. She is hoping to take a few classes next semester as she eases back into her studies. This posting, however, is not really about her, but rather about all the kindness and love we have experienced along the way.

We have been showered with love and attention from family, friends and strangers alike. We cherish the hundreds of cards we received while in the hospital, letters from first graders, countless meals from neighbors, an ASU game ball presented by the Coach, teddy bears, flowers, gifts and most of all kind thoughts and prayers. The children’s music community of artists and songwriters have embraced us as well.

We are ever more aware of the importance of nurturing this kindness in our children. Our teacher friend, Emily, sent us a treasured book of letters and pictures from her first grade class. An incredible example of teaching kindness. We also believe strongly that music can be a vehicle to teach these important values. (See our songs about Character Education).

And so we give thanks for all we have received especially during this trying time! (Also see our songs about Thanksgiving).

Peace, Alice & David Burba
Songs For Teaching Owners